All things that rise, converge.
Pierre Teilhard de Chardin

Do No Harm

Inner (Mind)Science. Sanskrit adhyatmavidya is the scientific tradition cultivated first within the Buddhist institutions of higher learning over the last millennia and then within all Indian spiritual institutions, based on the Buddha's original insight that the most powerful, subtle but controlling, aspect of nature is mind, accessed through the being's interior, not through the coarser level of material energies. For example, from the Inner Science perspective, the key, most creative and triggering,ingredient in a nuclear bomb is human hatred; thus hatred must be scientifically investigated, understood, and technologically controlled, if the world is to be made safe against nuclear holocaust.

The Tibetan Book of the Dead (44)

Earth's current cloud cover

That is important is the actuality of the Christ and it's teal and visibly active power. Only in the science of the spirit do we begin to understand what the Christ impulse is.

A first stage in the reception of this stream consists in the human noticing that at a particular point in their life they feel something flowering and coming alive in them. Previously it sat under the threshold of their consciousness, and they notice for the first time that it is there. It rises, filling them with inner light, inner warmth, and they know that this inner life, inner warmth, inner light, has arisen in them during life on earth. They acquire a greater knowledge of life on earth than was their birthright. They learn to know something which arises within them, a humanity during their life on earth. And if the human is sensible of the light and Life, of the love arising in them, and feels there the flowing, living presence of the Christ, they will receive strength — strength to grasp the fully human, the post-earthly, in the free activity of their own soul. Thus the Mystery of Golgotha and the Christ-impulse are intimately bound up with the attainment of human freedom, of that consciousness which is able to suffuse with inner life and warmth our mere thinking that is otherwise dead and abstract.

The exhortation Know Thyself & bring your humanity to fruition in your own inner life & has been addressed to humanity through all time, and is still in force today. But the experience of Christ in the human being is essential to our own day. It takes its place alongside the injunction & Know Thyself and must be given its full weight.

Self Knowledge and The Christ Experience by Rudolf Steiner

(edits note - 11/25/07) - sycholinguistic pronoun resolution issues - above quotes solely the work of Dominic A. Daley in honor of a 21 Century appropriate pronouns syntax- please excuse my forward looking linguistic freedom taken here and of course my slow to clean up code writing, that is really slow.

Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments; love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds
Or bends with the remover to remove.
O, no, it is an ever-fixed mark
That looks on tempest and is never shaken ;
It is the star to every wand'ring bark,
Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken.
Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
With his bending sickle's compass come ;
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
If this be error, and upon me proved,
I never writ, nor no man ever loved.

William Shakespeare -The Sonnets 116
written from 1593 - 1609

Compassion

Every act of compassion contains something of the pre-natal, heavenly power of knowledge we had before we underwent the great metamorphosis into earthly existence, whereas that other part of our life-filled interweaving with cosmic thoughts was turned by birth into our dead abstract thinking, into earthly knowledge. The two kinds of knowledge, which we might call earthly and heavenly, are polar opposites, as are the regions they lead into; for the world of matter, of mineral, of anything dead is all that dead thinking gives us access to, while compassion transports us into veritable pastures of life- the life of the soul. Compassion is what we must practice in order to develop the organ of knowledge which alone will lead us to a knowledge of the second spiritual man in us, the cloud-like being that passes from one earthly like to another.

Maria Roschl-Lehrs ( 2 )

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Mathis Gothart-Neithardt born, Matthias Grunewald (1470/80-1528) in Wurzburg




Kinderscenen- (Scenes from Childhood) by Robert Schumann (1810-1856) German composer

Not I, but Christ in me

Thus modern man cannot develop the same sort of humility that he needed in ancient times, which arose when he had to say of himself: 'Living in a physical body you are not yet fully human, you are only a candidate for humanity, not yet fulfilling your human dignity and worth. All you can do is prepare yourself for consciousness and freedom as they will arise in you immediately after death.' A more modern man, who has meanwhile lived under Greek conditions in a different incarnation, would say: 'Take heed that in your fleshly body between birth and death you do not neglect to be fully man. For as a modern man your inner task is the working-out of what has entered earthly life from the realm of the pre-earthly. You can become man on earth, and you must therefore take upon yourself the difficulty of becoming man on earth.' All this is expressed in the development of man's religious consciousness. On a previous occasion we saw how in earlier times man looked up principally to the Father God, and in Christ he had the Son of God. In God the Father he saw the creative source of substance and the supersensible origin of divine providence. Of this the earthly, perceptible world is merely an impress. He looked up to the cosmos from the earth; and in religious consciousness he looked up to God the Father. The pupils in the Mysteries had always been conscious that the most they could learn about man would be a preparation for the life after death. Now, through the Mystery of Golgotha, the Son of God has united with the earth's life, and man is able to develop an awareness of what St. Paul meant when he said 'Not I, but Christ in me'. Now man can so direct his inner life as to let the Christ-impulse come to flower in him; he can let Christ's life flow and breathe through him. He can absorb the stream which has come to us from pre-earthly life and bring it to fruition in his life on earth.

A first stage in the reception of this stream consists in man noticing that at a particular point in his life he feels something flowering and coming alive in him. Previously it sat under the threshold of his consciousness, and he notices for the first time that it is there. It rises, filling him with inner light, inner warmth, and he knows that this inner life, inner warmth, inner light, has arisen in him during life on earth. He acquires a greater knowledge of life on earth than was his birthright. He learns to know something which arises within his humanity during his life on earth. And if man is sensible of the light and Life, of the love arising in him, and feels there the flowing, living presence of the Christ, he will receive strength-strength to grasp the fully human, the post-earthly. in the free activity of his own soul. Thus the Mystery of Golgotha and the Christ-impulse are intimately bound up with the attainment of human freedom, of that consciousness which is able to suffuse with inner life and warmth, our mere thinking that is otherwise dead and abstract.

The exhortation 'Know Thyself -- bring your humanity to fruition in your own inner life' has been addressed to humanity through all time, and is still in force today. But the experience of Christ in man is essential to our own day. It takes its place alongside the injunction 'Know Thyself', and must be given its full weight.

Rudolf Steiner in Dornach, 2 February 1923

Love and Its Meaning in the World
Rudolf Steiner (19)

Ex Deo Nascimur ~ Out of God we are born
In Christo Morimur ~ In Christ we die.
Per Spiritum Sanctum Reviviscimus ~ Through the Holy Spirit we live again.

The ancient wisdom, acquired by the seer through revelation, comes to expression in the sublime words from the original prayer of mankind:

Ex Deo Nascimur -- Out of God we are born.

That is ancient wisdom. Christ who came forth from the realms of spirit has united wisdom with love and this love will overcome egoism. Such is its aim. But it must be offered independently and freely from one being to the other. Hence the beginning of the era of love coincided with that of the era of egoism. The cosmos has its source and origin in love; egoism was the natural and inevitable offshoot of love. Yet with time the Christ Impulse, the impulse of love, will overcome the element of separation that has crept into the world, and man can gradually become a participant in this force of love. In monumental words of Christ we feel love pouring into the hearts of men: Where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them.In like manner does the ancient Rosicrucian saying resound into the love that is wedded with wisdom:

In Christo Morimur -- In Christ we die.

Through Jehovah, man was predestined for a group-soul existence; love was to penetrate into him gradually by way of blood-relationship; it is through Lucifer that he lives as a personality. Originally, therefore, men were in a state of union, then of separateness as a consequence of the Luciferic principle which promotes selfishness, independence. Together with selfishness, evil came into the world. It had to be so, because without the evil man could not lay hold of the good. When a man gains victory over himself, the unfolding of love is possible. To man in the clutches of increasing egoism Christ brought the impulse for this victory over himself and thereby the power to conquer the evil. The Deeds of Christ bring together again those human beings who were separated through egoism and selfishness. True in the very deepest sense are the words of Christ concerning deeds of love: In as much as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me.

The Divine Deed of Love flowed back upon the earthly world; as time goes on, in spite of the forces of physical decay and death, the evolution of mankind will be permeated and imbued with new spiritual life through this Deed -- a Deed performed, not out of egoism but solely out of the spirit of love.

Per Spiritum Sanctum Reviviscimus -- Through the Holy Spirit we live again.

Love and Its Meaning in the World

Rudolf Steiner (19)

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Ascension

Friedrich Benesch - Ascension (42)

Christ managed to save the human form in such as way that it has the power of shaping or dissolving the body as clouds are fashioned in the physical realm: cloud formation- cloud dissolution- bodily formation-bodily dissolution of the Resurrected One who is the Resurrection.

The Risen One is the Resurrection and the resurrection is the central mystery of the kingdom of the heavens, the kingdom of Christ which has arrived on earth. This realm has not only its sun, but also its clouds. All those things which he lived, did, taught, suffered on earth are not lost to him after three days; on the contrary they took shape around him in the images of his life on earth- the true Gospel. These images, these forces, gathered round him like clouds around a sun. They are the cloud forms of his realm, the kingdom of Christ on earth: between fire, air, water, earth, mineral, plant, blossom, butterfly, animal, man, cloud, father, mother, child, brother, sister, thinking, feeling, willing- everywhere.

The Resurrection as a result,as a force, now becomes the lord of the heavenly forces upon earth in the realm of the clouds.

The first result of the Ascension is that Christ let knowledge and perception of himself shine out of this initially invisible, inaccessible cloud realm of consciousness. Ten days later, he sends the spirit of knowledge, the spirit of understanding, from the realm of the clouds. The first result is the pouring out of the Spirit to each individual human being. Thus we can gradually come to feel, in embryonic form, what it means that this being should encompass all humanity and that his spiritual mission becomes individualized in each person, in the life of the soul, of consciousness, in knowledge and a higher comprehension.

Through this man becomes aware also that this spirit consciousness which he experiences is only possible because the second gift of Ascension follows: the being of Christ has entered the unconscious part of the soul, again in each individual human being. Let us try and experience tentatively and with care what it means to the Christ-being to die into the deeper, unconscious being of every human being, to fragment himself so that he can then send to each single human being individual powers of knowledge from the realm of the spirit. This is an interrelationship within man himself, between his conscious and unconscious soul life.

The third gift: mankind can celebrate the Christian cult and receive the individualized body and blood of Christ in the bread and the wine.

The fourth gift: Christ can appear to everybody as the one who returns out of the realm of the clouds.

Thus we approach the fifth gift of Ascension, which to a greater extent belongs to the future; the fifth result is grounded in the possibility that man's physical nature can be repeatedly taken up anew, so that the relationship between the spiritual, the soul and the physical in each individual person changes. This starts with breathing and enters the pulse, the blood. Breath and blood flow differently, the metabolic processes slowly begin to change- the person partakes in the power of the Resurrection right into his physical being.

'that which is gentle, which conciliates'

We can use the concept of 'that which is gentle, which conciliates' to see more clearly through inward observation the realm in which Christ lives with us on earth. Since we owe the lucid and liberating expression of conciliation to Goethe, let me close these reflections with his words.

cloud poems

And when we have differentiated,

then we have to bestow life again

to that which we have separated,

and take pleasure in its continued life.

Thus when the painter or the poet,

inspects the heavens

he lets their character emerge;

yet, given to him by ethereal spheres

that he grasp it, feel it, form it.

Friedrich Benesch- Ascension (42)

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